Every Creeping Thing

Earth's most beautiful creatures.

amnhnyc:

Silhouettes in the Hall of Biodiversity, beautifully captured by @jnsilva for #InsideAMNH.
Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Reblogged from laboratoryequipment

amnhnyc:

Silhouettes in the Hall of Biodiversity, beautifully captured by @jnsilva for #InsideAMNH.

Learn more about the #InsideAMNH Instagram collaboration and follow along @amnh to see much more.

Reblogged from laboratoryequipment

(Source: silent-musings)

Reblogged from ursulavernon

for-science-sake:

The Sea Angel (Gymnosomata) Is a group of sea slug that grow no larger than 5cm. These obscure little creatures are found in a wide range of habitats from polar to tropical regions of the sea. 

saltykun:

hatos:

confirmed

confirmed

Reblogged from sesshiebutt

saltykun:

hatos:

confirmed

confirmed

Reblogged from sophi-parks

internetcooldad:

Making friends with nature

malformalady:

Honey Ants are found in the Western Desert of Australia. They have adapted to their environment and developed an unusual method of storing food. The ants harvest honey dew, a by product of the digestion of Aphids. The Aphids suck the sap from trees and produce sweet honey dew liquid which they secrete. The ants use their antenna to stimulate the aphids to release this liquid. A symbiotic relationship has developed between the aphids and ants with the ants looking after the aphids in order to maintain their harvest of honeydew. The ants feed the excess honeydew to a special type of worker ant called repletes who stores the Honey Dew in their abdomens which can swell to the size of a small grape. The repletes hang from the ceiling of the hives underground and in times when food stores run low they are able to provide food for the colony. The Aboriginal tribes of the Western Desert dig into the ant colony’s to find the ants hive and to eat their honey, which is considered a delicacy.

Reblogged from stufftodraw

malformalady:

Honey Ants are found in the Western Desert of Australia. They have adapted to their environment and developed an unusual method of storing food. The ants harvest honey dew, a by product of the digestion of Aphids. The Aphids suck the sap from trees and produce sweet honey dew liquid which they secrete. The ants use their antenna to stimulate the aphids to release this liquid. A symbiotic relationship has developed between the aphids and ants with the ants looking after the aphids in order to maintain their harvest of honeydew. The ants feed the excess honeydew to a special type of worker ant called repletes who stores the Honey Dew in their abdomens which can swell to the size of a small grape. The repletes hang from the ceiling of the hives underground and in times when food stores run low they are able to provide food for the colony. The Aboriginal tribes of the Western Desert dig into the ant colony’s to find the ants hive and to eat their honey, which is considered a delicacy.

Reblogged from stufftodraw

thepredatorblog:

Lioness taking down an impala (by Izzy Defourny)

seriserotonin:

This is the Velella, a small free floating hydrozoan. It’s currently the only known species in the genus. - Imgur

Reblogged from seriserotonin

seriserotonin:

This is the Velella, a small free floating hydrozoan. It’s currently the only known species in the genus. - Imgur

seriserotonin:

Baby owls peeking out of their nest. - Imgur

Reblogged from seriserotonin

seriserotonin:

Baby owls peeking out of their nest. - Imgur

rnvsn:

Croc Tail / Mike Korostelev

 

Reblogged from stufftodraw

rnvsn:

Croc Tail / Mike Korostelev